Foie Gras Controversy May Point the Way for Rising Culinary Stars

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No matter your position on the Foie Gras Controversy, there’s evidence of a strong shift in our desired relationship with food. Read more to find out what it is exactly.

Sure, the Foie Gras controversy rages on – and some cities continue to work to ban it – but no matter your position on the Foie Gras controversy, this video helps to communicate a broader message. The message I took from this video (and some of the recent Food Documentaries) is that our modern day approaches to making food and nature better are flawed.

The message is that, more often than not, food tastes better when the chef works to help nature shine through the food rather than wrestling and forcing his will on the food. Many indicators point to a modern day consumer that seeks more authenticity in the food, to better understand where they food came from and the story behind that (see Celebrity Chef trend), and a return to more natural foods that better respect the earlier agricultural systems before there were patented (Frankenstein versions of) soy beans and molecular manipulations of our foods.

While you’re still more likely to see fructose corn syrup be in far more plentiful supply than actual fruits at McDonald’s and other mass-feeders, there is strong indication of a shift in our desired relationship with food. Hope you will also visit my blog post on Food Industry Evolution. Aaron Allen & Associates provides a holistic approach to the restaurant business. From conception to implementation, we pride ourselves on our commitment to the details, building concepts from the inside out. With experience in all 6 inhabited continents, in over 100 countries, and a client base who posts a combined $100 billion annually, we let our results speak for themselves.

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