What’s Changed with Food Trucks?

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The food truck sector of the restaurant industry has grown 8.4% from 2007 to 2012, and is slated to be a $2.7 billion business by 2017. From sustainable concepts to technological improvements, food trucks have come a long way since the mobile lunchbox concept of the 1970s to the modern gourmet-on-the-go business we see today. Here’s what’s changed with food trucks.

Food Truck Design

Food trucks have become more than just, well, trucks that serve food. Some owners design their trucks around the concept of sustainability – embodying their company’s values into their truck design with solar panels and water waste reduction practices in place. Others design their trucks around the experience. Recess is a San Diego based company that has made their food truck into a mobile playground. The truck features a 50” LCD television as well as an Xbox Kinect device for guests to leave their office cubicles and blow off some steam at lunch.

Big Brands Turn to Trucks

Many chain operations have taken note of the food truck business’ potential. Over 15 percent of the largest restaurant chains – such as Burger King, Jack in the Box, and Taco Bell – have a food truck outlet.
Burger King Food Truck

Food Trucks Get Tech Savvy

Growing from Kogi BBQ’s example of using Twitter to let guests know where the food truck is, technologically inclined food trucks have begun developing their own mobile apps. New York food truck Schnitzel and Things has its own app to update guests with the latest menu and location. People can even order their food online.

Just like any other industry, those willing to embrace new trends and technologies are rewarded with increased business.

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